Julia John
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Julia is a Food Tank intern who recently graduated from Johns Hopkins University with a master’s degree in environmental science and policy. With a background in environmental journalism, she has written about sustainable food and conservation for various print and online publications, from a local Vermont paper to the international news site Mongabay. She’s especially interested in alternative proteins, waste reduction and wildlife protection. Her hobbies include playing sports, taking long walks and befriending indifferent alley cats.

Grasslands Are Turning into Carbon Sources, Study Finds

Worldwide, grasslands absorb as much carbon as they emit, but climbing demand for meat and dairy and poor land management threaten this balance.

Agrivoltaics May Offer Fresh Way to Produce Food and Energy

Placing solar panels on America’s farms could generate more than 100,000 rural jobs and eliminate as much carbon from the atmosphere as taking 71,000 cars off the road each year.

From Fish to Wrappers, PFAS Contaminate the Food System

Most people in the United States have PFAS in their blood, and food and food packaging makes up the bulk of their exposure to these persistent, widespread substances.

Can Climate Victory Gardens Help Solve the Climate Crisis?

Green America’s Climate Victory Gardens campaign involves 8,200 gardens that collectively remove over 4,300 tons of carbon from the atmosphere each year.

Reusable Tableware Could Resolve China’s Plastic Problem

This solution could decrease waste production by over 90 percent and environmental emissions and water consumption by over 66 percent.

Monoculture Could Worsen Vulnerability to Climate Change

To boost agricultural resilience, research suggests, policymakers and producers must create more diverse farms by considering how single-species fields interact with water and feed into environmental threats.

Farming Right Can Boost Soil Lifespans, Research Shows

By countering erosion, soil conservation techniques could allow farmers to feed the world for more than 10,000 years.